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IRS Cases

IRS Penalty Abatement: What are the Reasonable Cause Criteria?

IRS Penalty Abatement: What are the Reasonable Cause Criteria?

By on Apr 10, 2018 in IRS, IRS Cases, Tax Debt | 0 comments

Internal Revenue Service (IRS) penalties for filing or paying your taxes late can add up quickly and be financially detrimental.  If you owe back taxes to the IRS, you should work to develop a plan that allows you to pay off your debt as soon as possible to help avoid additional interest and/or penalties.  There are instances in which the IRS will abate the penalties that you owe. The most common reason for penalty abatement is called “reasonable cause.” The IRS will take each request for penalty abatement on a case-by-case basis and you should be prepared to provide a very compelling reason why you are requesting that your penalty be waived. In most cases, the issue that prevented you from filing must be out of your control. Some common examples of reasonable cause include: Death or unexpected serious illness of the taxpayer, a family member or loved one Natural disasters such as a fire, flood, or other unexpected disturbance Unavoidable absence, including being incarcerated or being in a rehabilitation facility Inability to determine the amount that you owe for a reason that was out of your control Another reason which clearly shows that you used all ordinary business care and prudence to meet your Federal tax obligations but were still unable to do so. Gathering the Information for File a Request for Penalty Abatement It is also important to note that insufficient funds are not considered a reasonable cause for failure to file or pay your taxes to the IRS. However, the reason that you don’t have sufficient funds may meet the criteria for a reasonable cause penalty abatement. Additionally, interest cannot be abated for reasonable cause. An interest that is charged on a penalty that you owe will be reduced or removed when that penalty is reduced or removed. If you decide to request a penalty abatement for reasonable cause, you should be prepared to provide detailed information to the IRS about the circumstances that prevented you from paying and/or filing on time.  Relevant documentation may include hospital records, a death certificate, letter from a physician with a description of illness, or documentation of a natural disaster. You should provide as much detail as you can, specifically...

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IRS Payment Plans: Is It the Right Option for You?

IRS Payment Plans: Is It the Right Option for You?

By on May 29, 2017 in IRS Audit, IRS Cases | 0 comments

  Not everyone knows that you can schedule payment plans with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). They usually assume that the dollar amount owed is the dollar amount they must pay—and rightfully so. After all, it’s stated in the official IRS letter! However, it is also possible to negotiate the amount of money you owe to the IRS. In order to do either one of these two things, you need to know what you’re doing, and you need to be prepared to speak with an IRS representative on a frequent basis. You’ll need to follow up and stay in constant communication, because the honest truth is that with the IRS, you are a number. They don’t know you personally and they are in the business of collecting tax debt from millions—billions of United States citizens. While they won’t chase after you to pay your debt, they will remain consistent in taking the necessary steps in collecting it. If you don’t comply, then you are in danger of wage garnishment, liens, and even imprisonment. The IRS is very methodical when it comes to collecting tax money. You need to be too to prevent the consequences from escalating to such dire circumstances.   Communication is Key!   The professionals at Success Tax Relief understand that not everyone has the time to wait on the phone with the IRS to speak to a representative only to get placed on hold again. We know that many taxpayers try to handle their tax situation themselves—using their lunch break to talk to a representative only to discover an hour is not enough time to resolve the situation. Other taxpayers may work odd hours or even hold multiple jobs, not even having the time to make the phone call. Yet, in a situation like this, it is absolutely critical that you make the time or hire someone who does.   Tax Relief Firms Have the Time You Don’t   Success Tax Relief, a tax relief firm that has been in business for over three decades, has been in the business of helping taxpayers resolve their tax debt by either reducing the amount owed, scheduling an affordable monthly payment, or eliminating the amount altogether! In our 30...

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Do You Owe the IRS But Can’t Pay? Here Are All Your Options

Do You Owe the IRS But Can’t Pay? Here Are All Your Options

By on May 15, 2017 in IRS, IRS Audit, IRS Cases, tax companies | 0 comments

It may be difficult to figure out how you’re going to pay your taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) when you may already be struggling with other outstanding debt. Tax debt is very different from your “regular” debt, because when it comes to taxes, it’s a federal issue, and unlike other debt, a federal tax issue cannot and will not be ignored. Ignoring your tax debt is something that shouldn’t be taken lightly. Doing so will result in serious consequences that could disrupt your life. The good news is that such serious consequences can all be avoided, even if you cannot afford to pay the entire tax debt. The IRS is Not as Bad as You Think! The IRS may react with serious consequences toward negligent taxpayers, but they also provide an ample amount of fair warning. You’ll first receive an official letter from the IRS stating that you owe ‘x’ amount of dollars. It is then your responsibility to confirm this or pay. It is highly recommended to call the IRS yourself to confirm that it is a legitimate claim. At that point, you’ll need to communicate to them that you can’t afford to pay the entire amount. Be Honest It’s OK to say this. You won’t get in trouble. It’s better than not saying anything at all. By not saying anything, the IRS will assume that you are purposely ignoring them and have no intentions of paying your tax debt. You don’t want them to assume this. Wage garnishments, loss of property, and worse, imprisonment along with addition fines to pay can be the consequences you’ll have to face. That’s why it’s always better to communicate with the IRS to make sure that they have a record of you trying to work out some sort of payment arrangement with them. Just don’t ignore them! Communicate and You’ll Be OK! The IRS is more reasonable than you may think as long as you’re keeping the communication lines open. As long as you let them know that you’re not able to pay the full debt amount off, but are willing to comply, then an IRS representative will arrange an affordable monthly payment plan with you. The Catch… The...

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Fake IRS Agents Arrested in India! How to Protect Yourself From Future Scams

Fake IRS Agents Arrested in India! How to Protect Yourself From Future Scams

By on Dec 30, 2016 in IRS Cases | 0 comments

This fall, police in India made arrests of 70 individuals for allegedly posing as Internal Revenue Service (IRS) agents in order to steal money from United States citizens. The Indian authorities have also stated that they are also investigating over 600 more individuals for similar fraudulent activity. These individuals allegedly called residents in the United States and claimed that the taxpayers owed back taxes to the IRS. In some cases, these call agents threatened the victims with arrest, or a lawsuit if payment was not made. The authorities estimate that $150,000 was being made each day during the scheme when frightened Americans fell for the scam and that there were likely individuals inside the US assisting with the scam. Call centers were found in Mumbai, India and an estimated $15 million has been lost by victims. Here are some helpful things to remember to protect yourself from future scams: The IRS will NEVER call you by phone and demand money. If you have a tax bill owed to the IRS, they will always contact you by mail first. The IRS will not threaten an immediate lawsuit to settle a dispute. There is a lengthy process for those who owe money to the IRS. And, the IRS always offers an option for appeal, so an immediate lawsuit, or arrest is never threatened. The IRS will not specify a required payment method (including prepaid gift or debit card or wire transfer). These payment options should be an immediate red flag of a scam. The IRS will also not ask you for a credit card number over the phone. Do NOT provide any type of payment no matter the threat. If you are concerned, call the IRS directly at 1-800-829-1040 to confirm your tax status. Do not engage with the person on the phone. If a person claims to be from the IRS but you think it is a scam, get off the phone as soon as possible (hang up even if you are being asked questions) and do not provide any personal information. If you receive a threatening voicemail message claiming to be from the IRS, do not return the call. Stay alert and vigilant and report potential scams by calling...

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IRS Phone Call Scams – What to Watch Out For!

IRS Phone Call Scams – What to Watch Out For!

By on Dec 2, 2016 in IRS Cases | 0 comments

The main thing to look out for in a tax scam is the phone call itself. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) doesn’t make it their business to call taxpayers and demand money with threats. If this is what you’re getting, you are NOT talking to an authentic IRS representative. If you owe money to the IRS, they will first inform you by letter. Even then, you must be extremely careful to make sure that the letter itself is authentic. One thing to keep in mind is that criminals turn scamming into an art. This means that they practice making themselves look and sound as authentic as possible. It’s your job to distinguish the real representative from the impersonator and the team at Success Tax Relief can help you do that. The first thing to know is how the IRS actually operates. Here is a brief list of the things that the IRS will NOT do: The IRS does not contact taxpayers by email. The IRS does not contact taxpayers by text messages. The IRS does not contact taxpayers by social media. The IRS will not use any of the aforementioned ways to request personal or financial information. The IRS will not threaten taxpayers with lawsuits or prison. The IRS will not ask for credit or debit card numbers by phone. The IRS will not demand money without giving you the opportunity to question the amount owed and/or work out a payment plan. The IRS will not threaten to call the police if you don’t pay. Knowing these facts alone will help you avoid those IRS phone call scams. Other Ways Scammers Operate The IRS phone scams are not always about them getting you to send them money. If these criminals can extract any personal information from you, they can open up a line of credit in your name that you have no idea exists—until you check your credit score and by then it’s too late. So usually, how this particular scam would go is that they’ll inform you that there’s a large sum of money coming to you…all you have to do is supply them with your social security number. Don’t do it! One thing to keep in mind...

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How to Avoid IRS Phone Scams

How to Avoid IRS Phone Scams

By on Jan 5, 2016 in Consultation, IRS, IRS Cases | 0 comments

It can be by phone, email, social media, or regular ‘snail’ mail. With the popularity of social media, the precautions of avoiding Internet scammers have been broadcasted throughout the world. With all the warnings about catfishing and other online scams, some have forgotten that the good old-fashion phone scams still exists. Scam artists will target their victims anyway they can, disguising themselves with a random alias or even as a government official targeting taxpayers and new immigrants. Now that almost everyone owns a private cellphone with the option to block telemarketers and solicitors, it used to be that the treat of a phone scam was a thing of the past. Not so. The Art of Scamming Scam artists are just that—artists! This means they creatively find ways to do something differently—unconventional even, including gaining access to your private phone number. According to the Internal Revenue Service(IRS) there have been telephone scams with con artists posing as one of their representatives. They even provide badge numbers in order to present themselves as official US government workers. These criminals have even found a way to manipulate your caller I.D. to read “IRS” or “Internal Revenue Service.”  Types of IRS Phone Scams Reported  These IRS phone scammers will have a significant amount of information about you in order to make you believe that they are legit. However, it is important to remember that with the use of social media and everything else being electronic, scammers can also hack into these databases to retrieve sensitive information about you.  The IRS Phone Scammers Has 3 Agendas:  Demanding Payment –The imposter will inform you that you owe the IRS money and demand immediate payment through a pre-loaded debit card or wire transfer. This demand is accompanied with threats of an arrest, incarceration, suspension of driver’s license and deportation.  Request to Claim Refund– Some scammers find it easier to steal money by extracting private information like a social security number and bank account numbers. They attain this by tricking you into believing that you are due a refund and in order to claim it, you’ll have to give them certain information about yourself. Don’t do it!  Urgent Callback Message –This is the last alternative. If you...

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