Call Today: 877-825-1179

La Porte Chamber of Commerce
VERIFIED Seal Success Tax Relief, LLC BBB Business Review    

Tax Resolution

Georgia’s State Tax Liens Statute of Limitations

Georgia’s State Tax Liens Statute of Limitations

By on Nov 26, 2017 in State Tax Lien, Tax relief, Tax Resolution | 0 comments

  If you have received notice that the Georgia Department of Revenue (GDOR) has issued a tax lien or are concerned that this may be on the horizon, now is the time to act and resolve your back tax debt once and for all.  A tax lien is a very serious legal claim that the state can issue against taxpayers that gives legal claim of your property to the state as security or payment of your tax debt.  A tax lien is generally a last resort effort by the GDOR, after many attempts have been made to recover a taxpayer’s debt.  It can have significant impact on your personal (or business) financial outlook, including your credit score and ability to qualify for a wide variety of loans. How to Release a Georgia State Tax Lien A release of a tax lien is possible and can be obtained if you meet one of the following criteria: When the tax liability has been resolved (ie. paid in full); If you can prove that the lien was filed in error (you can request a formal withdrawal of the lien); Expired liens (also known as statute-barred liens) do not attach to any property interest of the taxpayer whose name appears on the lien. Statute of Limitations Related to State Tax Liens   There is a defined statute of limitations on tax liens that you should also be aware of. State tax liens must be filed within seven years of the assessment date of the tax liability.  Once the Georgia Department of Revenue files a lien, it has seven years from the date the lien was recorded to collect the debt from a taxpayer. It’s also important to note that a tax lien may also be renewed for an additional seven-year period by re-recording the lien prior to the expiration of the previous seven-year period. Even if a tax lien is released, withdrawn, or expires, it can be extremely difficult to get this “mark” off of your credit report if it hits one of the three main credit bureaus: Equifax Experian TransUnion National credit bureaus make their own rules for how long a tax lien can be kept as public record.  This can impact...

Read More
5 Things to Consider Before Negotiating With the IRS

5 Things to Consider Before Negotiating With the IRS

By on Nov 25, 2017 in IRS, Negotiating with IRS, Tax Resolution | 0 comments

In the last few years, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has made it easier for taxpayers to make headway when it comes to back taxes.  The Fresh Start programs offer Americans with tax debt a way to pay it off and actually get a clean slate. These changes include expanding the Offer in Compromise program that allows taxpayers to pay their debt for less than they owe, creating easier pathways for installment agreements so that payments can be made over time rather than in one lump sum. Negotiating with the IRS about your tax debt can still be tricky and sometimes stressful.  Here are five tips for how you can negotiate with the IRS: Steps to Take When Negotiating With the IRS Act Sooner Rather Than Later:  Penalties and interest add onto your tax debt every single day. So, there is no better time than now to get control over your tax situation once and for all. Whether you have received a written notice from the IRS about your debt or you know you owe money but the IRS may not have reached out yet, the sooner you pay the tax debt, the better the outcome will be for you down the road. The IRS will not forget that you owe them money and the consequences of not paying get more serious as time passes. Always File Your Tax Returns:  The only way that you can qualify for the tax programs that may help you get that fresh start is to be current on your tax returns.  Even if you’re unable to pay what you owe, you should file the return because it can reduce some of the penalties. Request an Installment Agreement:  An installment agreement is a great way to get your tax debt under control. Instead of paying your debt in one large lump sum, an installment agreement allows you to make monthly payments and pay it over time.  The IRS has loosened its restrictions in this regard and are now allowing more installment agreements, so this could be a great option for finally paying your debt. Get Help If You Need It:  If you have received written communication from the IRS and trying to decide the...

Read More
The First Steps You Need to Take to Settle Your Back Taxes

The First Steps You Need to Take to Settle Your Back Taxes

By on Nov 20, 2017 in Tax Debt, Tax Resolution, Tax Tips | 0 comments

If you owe back taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), chances are you have already spent a lot of time worrying about how to resolve this debt without significantly impacting your day to day life.  Tax debt is a large financial and emotional burden and can be difficult to navigate on your own. Here are some tips on how you can settle your tax debt with the IRS once and for all. Key Steps to Settle Your Outstanding Tax Debt Confirm the exact amount that you owe:  If you have received a written notice from the IRS that includes an amount that you owe in back taxes, you should check this against your tax returns to ensure it is an accurate reflection of your debt. Your calculation may be different than the calculation the IRS has made, so it will be helpful to know the amount you actually owe. This will include the debt plus any interest and penalties accrued. File all tax returns: Even if you cannot pay what you owe, it is extremely important to file your tax returns each year. If you do not, you disqualify yourself from several important and possibly helpful programs that could settle your debt without paying it in one lump sum.  Filing your returns on time automatically reduces the number of penalties the IRS will charge you. Penalties and interest can add up fast and compound your problem. Face your problem sooner rather than later:  The longer you wait to address your back taxes, the worse the problem becomes. The IRS may not contact you for a period of time about your back taxes, but they will eventually want a payment.  The longer you wait to address the issue, the more you will owe in penalties in interest and the more difficult it will be to pay. Do you qualify for a payment plan?:  The IRS offers installment agreements to many taxpayers who owe money to the IRS. This allows you to pay your debt (and interest and penalties) over time via monthly payments, rather than a large lump sum.  Just like a credit card, you will have a minimum amount due and as long as you pay on time....

Read More
Can You Negotiate Your Georgia State Back Taxes?

Can You Negotiate Your Georgia State Back Taxes?

By on Nov 13, 2017 in Tax Debt, Tax Resolution, Tax Tips |

Negotiating back taxes is not generally something most taxpayers think is even possible. But, over the last decade or so, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and state tax agencies have been working to improve overall accessibility and the perception that they are willing to work with taxpayers. The Georgia Department of Revenue (GDOR) has instituted several programs to help Georgia taxpayers with a fresh start.  It does require some negotiation and communication with the IRS. You can negotiate directly with the IRS to reduce the amount of tax that you owe or to request that you pay it back over time rather than in a large lump sum.   Here are some tips on how to negotiate in a way that may yield positive results for you! Offer in Compromise: If you are unable to afford the tax debt you have incurred with the state of Georgia, you may qualify for an Offer in Compromise (OIC). This agreement allows you to pay less than the amount you owe.  You should be aware that before you apply, you must have already filed your past tax returns.  You may qualify for a Georgia OIC if you meet one of the following criteria:   You are unable to pay the entire amount of taxes you owe, even by selling assets or through an installment agreement. There is a legitimate doubt that you actually owe part or all of your assessed tax debt. There is a special circumstance that makes full payment of the taxes owed an economic hardship.       2. Installment Agreement:  An installment agreement allows you to pay your tax debt off over time, rather than all at once. Spreading the   payment of your debt over time can offer the flexibility that you might need to finally pay off your tax debt.  You should complete Form GA-9465 to apply. In order to be eligible, you cannot have filed bankruptcy, have any unfiled or late tax returns, or have a pending offer in compromise with the Georgia Department of Revenue.  Finally, if your state tax liability has been assigned to a private collection agency, you will not be eligible for an installment agreement. How To Negotiate With The GDOR The best way to...

Read More
Owe Money to the IRS? 4 Steps to Lower Your Debt

Owe Money to the IRS? 4 Steps to Lower Your Debt

By on Jul 25, 2017 in Tax Resolution, Tax Tips, Taxes | 0 comments

Are you one of the millions of Americans who owes money to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)?  Whether you are behind because you have been overwhelmed and have not had time to get your taxes done, or you fear that you simply do not have enough money to pay, it is important to get a handle on your personal tax situation as soon as possible. Once the IRS realizes that you have not paid your taxes, they will begin to reach out to you. First by email, then communication will get more serious the longer your taxes remain unpaid.  The most serious consequences are wage garnishments, levies on your bank account and liens on your property. These consequences should be avoided at all costs as they can lead to serious financial hardship. There are several important steps you can investigate today to lower your tax debt and get back on the road to financial freedom: How to Help Lower Your Tax Debt Installment Agreement: An installment agreement is a monthly payment plan that you establish with the IRS so that you can pay your debt over time, rather than in one lump sum.  It’s essentially like a credit card payment and you will pay over a period of months (or years) your debt as well as interest and fees that have accrued.  In some cases, individuals qualify for a partial payment installment agreement, which allows you to make monthly payments on a reduced dollar amount. Offer In Compromise: An offer in compromise gives you the opportunity to settle your debt for less than you actually owe.  This is particularly useful when you owe the IRS more money than you can afford.  An offer in compromise requires much paperwork and is not always granted, but can save you thousands of dollars if you qualify. Bankruptcy: There are instances in which your tax debt may be eligible to be waived under Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 of the Bankruptcy Code. Doing so requires some intricate knowledge of tax law and bankruptcy law, so you may want to consult with a professional if you are considering this route. Seek Professional Tax Support: Getting out from under tax debt with the IRS is...

Read More
How to Successfully Get Out of Tax Debt in 1 Year!

How to Successfully Get Out of Tax Debt in 1 Year!

By on Mar 11, 2017 in Debt Relief, Tax Resolution, Tax Tips | 0 comments

If you realize that you owe a significant amount of money to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) this year, your attention may quickly turn to how into getting out of debt as quickly as possible.  Thinking ahead and developing a specific plan about how you will settle your debt to the IRS is an important first step.  Owing money to the IRS can be stressful as the IRS has the power to garnish wages and/or seize property in order to make sure that the debt is paid. Here are some tips for successfully getting out of your tax debt quickly in as little as one year: Request an installment agreement: An installment agreement can allow you to pay your tax debt to the IRS in monthly installments over a period of time.  This gives taxpayers more time to pay, rather than requiring a lump sum payment. Apply for an offer in compromise: In some cases, a taxpayer may be able to settle their tax debt for less than the full amount they owe. This is ideal for those whose tax debt exceeds what they can actually afford to pay.  If you qualify, you will be able to make a lump sum payment or short-term payment plan. Consider an alternate payment method: If you owe a large sum of money to the IRS, it may be wise to think of other sources of payment. A personal loan from a bank, opening a credit card at a low interest rate, or even asking for a loan from a family member can be a way to pay the debt to the IRS and eliminate the risk of wage garnishment and/or seizure of property. Declare yourself currently not collectable: There are instances in which you may be unable to pay your debt for a period of time. This can stop the IRS from pursuing things like wage garnishment or seizing property. File bankruptcy: Filing bankruptcy is something to consider in some rare cases when your tax debt is eligible for discharge (either via Chapter 7 or Chapter 13). Watch the expiration date for the statute of limitations: The IRS has a maximum of 10 years from the date of assessment to collect all...

Read More